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DSWD6 targets 394T elderly for social pension

STARTING this year, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Field Office VI is targeting 394,256 elderly in the implementation of the Social Pension Program.

Records show that an amount of P2.3 billion is allocated for this.

“Our target is actually five times bigger than our coverage in 2016. This means that we will be reaching more senior citizens,” said Rebecca Geamala, regional director.

In 2016, only 78,706 were targeted in the region.

The pensioners will be receiving P500 per month to be released at P1,500 every quarter or a total of P6,000 per year.

The program aims to augment the daily subsistence and other medical needs of indigent senior citizens.

It is in line with the fulfilment of the obligation of the government to protect the most vulnerable sector through social protection, and for the full implementation of the Republic Act 9994 or the Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010.

It also aims to improve the living condition of eligible indigent senior citizens./dswd6/May Rago-Castillo

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End child labor

#DSWDMayMalasakit #1MBatangMalaya #EndChildLabor

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DSWD6 sets aside P3M for Auring

The Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office VI has set aside a P3-million quick response fund for disaster response.
If needed, the fund can be utilized for the disaster relief operations for those affected by Auring.
Regional Director Rebecca P. Geamala said the department maintains the standby fund for any disaster that might happen.
Apart from the available fund, Geamala added that there are 10, 200 food packs available in the regional office.
Also, there were prepositioned goods in the provinces of Capiz and Antique.
The agency assures the public on its readiness to perform its augmentation role for whatever disaster to the LGUs in all provinces./dswd6/Merry Jezzel Brendia

APPROVED FOR RELEASE:

REBECCA P. GEAMALA
Regional Director

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Yolanda survivors find relief in livelihood aid

WITH a smile in her face, she hurriedly went inside the Sustainable Livelihood Office in Concepcion, Iloilo.

Maribeth Morano, of the said town, excitedly shared the information from her record book about the income she and her husband received out of -sales in fishing.

“I recorded a net profit of P18,000 in nine days!” she said with a happiness she could not contain.
Maribeth is only one of the 231 beneficiaries of the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) under the Department of Social Welfare and Development.
Maribeth with other beneficiaries were trained on Marine Sanctuaries and Conservation. During the activity, they were provided with fishing gear as starter kit.
“Because of our earning, we paid the tuition for college and boarding house rental of our children,” Maribeth said.
Lavilla Miguel, of the same municipality, shares the joy of Maribeth.
Lavilla also shared her record book showing that within eight days, she and her husband had a fish catch of 141 kilograms making them bring a net take home amounting to P9,400.
“We used the money for household needs and boat repair,” said Lavilla.
During the training, the two women and the rest of the beneficiaries were also taught proper recording.

SLP
SLP is a community-based capacity building program, SLP increases the economic opportunities of the families through the different modalities that it offers such as skills training, seed capital fund, pre-employment assistance fund, and the cash for building livelihood assets.
It is implemented through the Community-Driven Enterprise Development Approach which equips program participants to actively contribute to production and labor markets by looking at available resources and accessible markets./dswd6/Erwina Soltis

Captions:
1. Maribeth
2. Lavilla

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Solo parents shine in candle making

“SOMETIMES, those who fly solo have the strongest wings,” a saying goes.

This is proven true by solo parents from Concepcion, Iloilo who are skilled in candle making as they begin to shine in this line of trade.

“We are happy that we already have regular buyers now,” said Rosa Abebenir, 42 years old, who is one of the beneficiaries.

Around 25 of them who form the Candle Maker’s Association of Concepcion (CMAC) are regularly delivering candles for Immaculate Concepcion Parish Church, displaying candles at Concepcion Kabuhayan Enterprise, sells during feasts of nearby towns and occasions like All Saints Day.

These women were trained by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Field Office VI under the Sustainable Livelihood Program with a funding of P268,000.

The DSWD tapped the Provincial Social Welfare Development Office to train them on candle making including the sales and marketing while the St. Nicolas Training Institute, Incorporated conducted skills enhancement training.

Currently, these women have a production center in the municipality./dswd6/Erwina Soltis

Captions:
1. Solo parents from Concepcion, Iloilo who are now into candle making business

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DSWD6 provides augmentation for Iloilo, Capiz

ardo2THE DSWD6 provided augmentation in form of relief goods for those affected by typhoon Marce in Iloilo and Capiz Province.

Asst. Regional Director for Operations Delia Villa-Bagolcol said that the agency has released 1,620 family food packs.

If broken down, 1,120 packs were released for Capiz and 500 packs for Passi City in Iloilo.

Aside from this, Bagolcol assured that the agency has sufficient stockpile to augment the LGUs in case the need arises.

“We have 36,000 family food packs in our stockpile,” said Bagolcol.

She also said that the Quick Response Team (QRT) of the Field Office is in full alert./dswd6/May Rago-Castillo

 

(Signed by ARDO Delia Bagolcol)

REBECCA P. GEAMALA

Regional Director

 

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DSWD now on full alert for ‘Marce’; reminds the public to monitor irregularities in relief ops

With Tropical Depression ‘Marce’ moving across the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Judy Taguiwalo has directed all disaster monitoring and response units of the DSWD in full alert.
Based on today’s 6AM updated from the DSWD Disaster Response Operations Monitoring and Information Center (DROMIC), 285 families or 1,100 persons from the provinces of Dinagat Island, Surigao del Norte and Surigao del Sur in the CARAGA Region are currently staying in 19 evacuation centers.
Meanwhile in Cebu, some 548 families or 2,740 persons are currently taking pre-emptive evacuation in Toledo Sports Complex.
Currently, the Disaster Response Assistance and Management Bureau (DReAMB) of the DSWD is intensifying its coordination with concerned Local Government Units (LGUs) in monitoring the areas affected by the inclement weather.
“DSWD’s DreamB is now closely monitoring weather developments and coordinating with other concerned disaster units of the government to ensure there are no surprises that Marce can spring on us. We want to constantly improve and develop our disaster response for the people and make sure all our skills, information and resources are utilized well and maximized for their aid and benefit before, during, and after calamities,” said DReAMB Dir. Felino Castro V.
Sec. Taguiwalo also assures the public that DSWD Field Offices already made advance preparations for ‘Marce’ by continuously updating the status of stockpiles and standby funds and closely monitoring the typhoon’s track.
“We assure the public that despite the huge number of relief items distributed to families affected by previous typhoons, the Department still has enough stockpiles and standby funds that can be used in disaster situations,” said the Secretary.
Moreover, the Secretary calls for strengthened coordination of concerned agencies and the public to minimize any possible casualty during the onslaught of the typhoon. She also reminded citizens to continue to monitor all irregularities in the delivery of relief assistance and operations.
“We have to admit that there are still many problems and weaknesses in the system of relief provision — and these problems have to do with our coordination with LGUs and baranggay units. We reiterate our call to members of the public to be vigilant and monitor rescue and relief actions for all irregularities or failure of service and assistance delivery. We ask the public to report in detail the irregularities they see or monitor so we can address them as soon as we can and to improve the process,” she said.
“We have already surpassed numerous typhoons because of our Bayanihan. Let us continue this practice so we can reach more in need. So much needs to be done to develop and strengthen the resilience of our communities and ensure that they can bounce back in the wake of calamities. Let us help one another, coordinate efforts and cooperate so we can ensure zero or very minimal loss of life even if as yet we cannot lessen damage to property,” she said. ###

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DSWD6, RJJWC push scrapping of house bills lowering criminal liability

ILOILO CITY-The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Field Office VI and the Regional Juvenile Justice and Welfare Council (RJJWC) jointly called for the scrapping of house bills which seek to lower the minimum age of criminal responsibility.kathy
“A nine-year-old child has a very young mind. There are even studies which suggest that our brains grow until the age 25,” said Katherine Joy Lamprea of the JJWC.
The RJJWC and the DSWD6 gathered members of the media recently in a forum to highlight the observance of the Juvenile Justice Consciousness Week with the theme, “Rehab, hindi rehas: Itaguyod ang RA 10630.”
It can be recalled that lawmakers have filed several bills seeking to revert the effects of Republic Act (RA) Number 9344 or the Juvenile Delinquency Act of 2006, which raised the minimum age of criminal liability from 9 years to 15 years old.
RA 10630, is an act Strengthening the Juvenile Justice System in the Philippines, amending RA 9344.
Lamprea cited the following reasons why they are pushing for the non-passage of the housebill:
• Early incarceration is the most harmful and counter-productive measure in preventing child re-offending
• The most effective diversionary strategy is to remove children from the youth justice system by significantly raising the age of criminal responsibility
• Lowering the minimum age of criminal responsibility and putting children in jail will not address the issue of criminal syndicates using children to commit crimes
• 98.46 percent of all crimes reported to the PNP are crimes committed by adults not children
• Lowering the age of criminal responsibility is against the best interest of the child. They would be in cramped, disease-ridden and filthy facilities with inadequate food, prone to physical, sexual and psychological abuse, will be in the company of adult murderers, rapists and pedophiles.
• It is a move which will burden both the national and local governments
• Human brain continues to develop until 21 and matures to as late as 25 years old
• Early onset of offending may be caused by impairment of brain structure and functioning due to childhood poverty and abuse
• Lowering of the minimum age of criminal responsibility is against our legal obligations as state party to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child
• It is also unconstitutional since it clearly violates the policy of the state to defend the right of children to special protection from all forms of neglect, abuse, cruelty and exploitation

EXPERIENCE SAYS IT’S NOT WRONG TO GIVE CICL ANOTHER CHANCE
Psychologist Robert Paul Joseph Eclar, assigned at the Regional Rehabilitation Center for Youth (RRCY), said that they believe in the capacity of children to change their life’s course.
“We. at the RRCY, have seen Children in Conflict with the Law (CICL) transform. We have former CICL who now have become teachers, seafarers, policemen and social workers,” said Eclar./dswd6/May R. Castillo

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